Transformania™ (Virtual) 2020 – Reimagining HR Leadership Registration is Open

HR Leadership Development from the Convenience of Your Home or Office

Transformania™ (Virtual) 2020 is a time-tested HR leadership development program for highly regarded HR leaders with 10 to 20 (or more) years of experience. It represents the most current and compelling version of numerous HR leadership development experiences led over the past eight years by Ian Ziskin, President, EXec EXcel Group, and Co-Founder and Partner, Business inSITE Group (BiG).  A content-rich, high quality, interactive, and engaging learning experience, this program unfolds virtually through six monthly two-hour modules from January 2020 to June 2020.

Led by EXec EXcel Group president Ian Ziskin, the program covers topics most relevant to HR leaders in today’s business world, including:

  • The Future of HR
  • Discovering Your Personal Leadership Profile
  • Leading Change
  • Developing Talent to Drive Performance

While Ian will lead the entire program, it will also include guest faculty, including a CHRO panel and several other practitioners and thought leaders.

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Program Content

The Transformania™ (Virtual) 2020 program content is based on Ian Ziskin’s 37+ years of experience as a CHRO, business executive, adviser, coach, consultant, teacher, speaker, and author.

Previously, the program had been available only in-person. By delivering Transformania™ virtually, the program is available at half the cost of the in-person version, and without time away from the office or home for participants.

The program draws heavily from several books Ian has written or co-edited, including Black Holes and White Spaces: Reimagining the Future of Work and HR with the CHREATE Project (2018) and THREE: The Human Resources Emerging Executive (2015), as well as from dozens of his articles, blogs, and book chapters.

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For more information, visit our Transformania™ (Virtual) 2020 page or you can also register online today by following the link below.

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The Art of the Pre-Meeting

One of the least understood and most influential tools for building strong relationships with board members is the art of the pre‐meeting. To illustrate, let’s consider an example:

The CHRO and the head of executive compensation are responsible for preparing the compensation committee chair and the other committee members for what will be discussed and potentially decided in each committee meeting. If you believe in the “no surprises” theory of management, as I do, your job is to ensure your compensation committee is well‐prepared for every meeting and that there are no surprises during the meeting.

To that end, it’s important that you meet or speak with the compensation committee chair before the meeting takes place. The agenda for this pre‐meeting usually includes a review of the committee meeting agenda, materials that need to be prepared, and a discussion of which agenda items are intended for information and discussion and which items require committee decisions and approvals.

Once the meeting materials are prepared, another pre‐meeting or discussion should take place to review the materials, answer the committee chair’s questions, and identify issues that may be particularly difficult or controversial.

Some HR leaders I know go through this process, not only with the compensation committee chair, but with each committee member prior to every committee meeting. This process takes an incredible amount of time, but not as much time as picking up the pieces following an extremely difficult and contentious compensation committee meeting where participating board members feel surprised, ignored, confused, or misinformed—or they simply don’t agree with management’s recommendations.

Pre‐meetings are essential to ensure mutual understanding of facts and assumptions, as well as clarity about where management, the board, committees, and board consultants agree and disagree. Most importantly, these pre‐meetings minimize the risk of surprises in the boardroom.

For example, it is highly undesirable and unproductive to have the CEO, CHRO, or head of executive compensation fighting with the independent compensation consultant in front of the board or compensation committee. Likewise, it is equally distasteful to have the chair and members of the compensation committee surprised by a position taken by their own consultant or by management. The “no surprises” rule should be standard operating procedure when working with the independent compensation consultant.

As HR leader for your organization, how are you employing the “Art of the Pre-Meeting” to your board meeting preparations?

Learn More

If you found this information valuable, check out my book, THREE: The Human Resources Emerging Executive, which you can preview at www.exexgroup.com/publications/three-book.

Be sure also to check out the FREE eBook Black Holes and White Spaces: Reimagining the Future of Work and HR with the CHREATE Project, published through the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and available for download on Amazon. It contains 26 essays from more than 70 chief HR officers and CHREATE Project volunteers and describes tools and frameworks for leaders inside and outside the HR profession.

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Six Questions to Help You Lead Change

Most change initiatives start with a grandiose vision of what the organization is going to be like following the change effort: “We will be the best, biggest, most profitable, most admired, most customer‐centric, greatest place to work on the planet, for all eternity. . . .”

There is absolutely nothing wrong with having such an aspirational view. In fact, it’s essential. But it’s the wrong place to begin. Often, in our zeal to identify the new, better, grander view of who we will be, we forget to spend time understanding who we are now, where we have come from, and what the positive attributes of the organization are that made us successful in the first place.

Even the most screwed up organizations were not always screwed up, and there is usually something worth preserving and nurturing. In fact, that “something” is often what the organization somehow lost along the way and is trying to get back to doing or being. So make sure you figure out what is worth preserving before you allow everyone to skip right past it.

I learned how to think about change with a series of six simple questions I could use to capture on one page what I most needed to know:

1. From what to what?

Failure to think about where you are coming from before you lock in on where you are going to is the most common mistake I see leaders (including HR) make when initiating change. What are you now; what will you be following the change effort?

2. For what reasons?

Why are you initiating a change process—to improve operating margins, grow revenue, become more globally competitive, be more customer‐centric, reduce bureaucracy, be more collaborative, drive innovation, become a better place to work . . . what?

3. What is the risk of unintended consequences?

Do you know how changing one aspect of the organization will affect other organizational dynamics? Like the human body, organizations can recover from well‐conceived and performed surgery, but they can suffer and even die if the surgery is poorly planned and executed.

4. What role do key leaders play?

Who are the “influencers” in your organization that drive what other people think? Find them, involve them, listen to them, and let them know what you want them to do.

5. What are the likely resistance points, and how do we overcome them?

Resistance points can be people, organizations, sacred cows, or other issues that you can or should assume will be difficult to persuade or overcome. As with your “Influencers,” find the resistance points, involve them, listen to them, and let them know what you need them to do—but never let them believe lack of cooperation will deter you from driving change.

6. How do we know whether we are going too far, or too fast?

This is often the toughest question to answer, because it usually takes longer than we would like to gather enough evidence to act on or respond to. Some early warning signs are that people don’t understand what is being asked of them, they have difficulty executing on expected changes, and more energy is being devoted to undermining planned changes than to understanding those changes. Moving too slowly can also negatively affect your change strategy. My advice is to err on the side of speed because most change efforts tend to move too slowly. I’ve found that if people hate the idea of change, they will complain whether it moves slowly or quickly. So put your energy into doing it right by addressing the above questions first, and then adjust the speed and intensity as you go.

Learn More

If you found this information valuable, check out my book, THREE: The Human Resources Emerging Executive, which you can preview at www.exexgroup.com/publications/three-book.

Be sure also to check out the FREE eBook Black Holes and White Spaces: Reimagining the Future of Work and HR with the CHREATE Project, published through the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) and available for download on Amazon. It contains 26 essays from more than 70 chief HR officers and CHREATE Project volunteers and describes tools and frameworks for leaders inside and outside the HR profession.

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